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The Yellow Wallpaper
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
7 Installments

Following the birth of her child, a woman becomes a prisoner in her own home, diagnosed as “hysterical” by her physician husband. Increasingly desperate, she begins to keep a journal in which she charts her mental unraveling. This feminist classic gives a terrifying glimpse into the ruined lives of countless Victorian women.

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Nov. 7, 2013
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
Interesting take on postpartum depression. An archaic way of dealing with it by a doctor. Very well written! I found the wallpaper to be very much like an onion with many layers. A good read.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I liked this story as a teenager and I revisited it via DailyLit over a lunch break one day. DO THIS.<br/><br/>I was stunned (again) how good it is. It's terrifying! And makes its feminist thesis perfectly clear while also being tragic and ominous. Coming from so far away as 1892, it's incredible to think what Gilman must have been like.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
An inside view of a young woman's experience as her mind begins to deviate from reality. Although Psychotic breaks are not common in post partium depression, they do exist. So few are aware of it today, but then it was just a nervous condition spiriling out of control. Like today, it was largely hidden from view.
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
Creepy. Really, creepy.
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
A brief and completely disturbing glimpse into a mentally ill woman's mind.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
Great read. Starts right away and keeps you reading till the end. Very sad for this poor woman. This is exactly the stuff that put psychology experts on the market! I loved it.<br/>kl.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
Interesting! Kind of scary that there a large number of women in this situation without any restraints and no one seeing they need help. YIKES
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
You really have to understand Gilman's life to know why she wrote the story but the depression after childbirth was very disturbing for this poor woman and the wallpaper.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
An interesting look into a depressed woman's mind.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I started with a daly feed of The Yellow Wallpaper. I resisted increasing the frequency and length of the feed for one day. After that I devoured it in one brief sitting. Loved it.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I actually read this for my English class this year and did a term paper on it. This short story is a whirlwhind of symbolism that portrays the woman's descent into madness as almost a liberation from the bonds placed on her by her husband. Gilman did an excellent job on this. It can certainly be read in one sitting, and though confusing, it offers an excellent look into the mind of a woman desperate for some freedom.
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
This story is easy to get through in the 8 episodes and seems to fly by. The graphic descriptions the author uses throughout are contemplative and vivid. I think this is a must read for aspiring fiction authors because of this. The linear projection of the storyline is also intriguing and keeps the reader motivated. I would resign yourself to read larger sections at a time, if not the whole thing at once. Enjoy!
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I couldn't get into it. I saw her direction and the word picture she was trying to paint, but I wasn't moved.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I got most of what was going on, but I'm not sure if what I was interpreting was what was happening. It would have been nice to have had an aha! Chapter... to hear the conversation bewtween John and Jennie... but I guess the point is just to think... trapped in thought... as she was...
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
I saw this performed for a speech contest and was interested to read it for myself. It is interesting to see as the story goes on how the narrator and the woman behind the wallpaper kindof blend together. The wallpaper obviously reflects the way the narrator feels and becomes more and more twisted as the narrator slowly loses her sense of reality. Very interesting. Lovely description with a surprise ending that left me with questions unanswered.
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
The symbolism by Gilbert is well woven, and the writing style is gripping. You shouldn't miss this and DO try to get to the symbolism. Just great!!
 
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Nov. 7, 2013
The Yellow Wallpaper made me try very hard to picture the wallpaper and the room and the smell... and I couldn't help thinking the whole time (while reading)<br/>of Oscar Wilde's line about either he or the wallpaper has got to go.
 
Nov. 7, 2013
 
Nov. 7, 2013
I'm glad i read a bit of biography on Charlotte before finishing the story - it is so impressive that she wrote this in that era and was as strong in her beliefs to be able to move forward on so many issues. This story was very helpful in that time to show that women should not be stuck in a room all day but also needed mental stimulation - her quote “There is no female mind. The brain is not an organ of sex. Might as well speak of a female liver.” was so advanced then.
 
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Feb. 16, 2014
Terrifying insight into just how powerless these women were.
 
May 21, 2014
 
July 13, 2014
 
June 30, 2016
 
Nov. 5, 2017
The Yellow Wallpaper
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